• Arts

    Meaning of Life—an over-thinker’s guide to the universe by Barb Cook

    I have elevated over-thinking to an art form. Ever since I was a small girl, I often wondered what life meant, right down to the atom level of existence. I have always felt compelled to believe that there was some higher meaning or bigger picture to this existence on planet earth and I want to know why, in detail, from every aspect and angle. In my pre-autistically identified younger days, I was often found lost in my head. The world inside often gave me a source of wonderment as well as a place to try and analyse all that I came across. In some sense, I was that little Miss Professor, taking on deciphering the world. It all started at the age of three when [...]
  • Advocacy

    Striking a Path into Neurotypical Space – Jeanette Purkis

    I am a forty-three year old Autistic woman. Like many other Autistic people I have some quite significant ‘differences’ setting me apart from my neurotypical peers. Some of these stem directly from my Autism—things like being unable to read body language or not noticing anyone’s emotions unless they tell me or give a strong hint. I don’t usually notice if someone is crying unless they are doing it loudly! I don’t ever ‘do’ eye contact. If I remember I will look at a spot on the bridge of the nose of the person I’m talking with, but more often than not I forget and look somewhere completely different to their face or any other part of them. I also have some things which are not [...]
  • Featured

    Thinking the Autism Way by Lisa Morgan

    Friendships are one of the best things in life, as well as, one of the hardest of all things to understand.  I want friendships, but they are a mystery to me.  Friendships are complicated, simple, painful, loving, scary, safe, and I could go on with my diametrically opposed words but I think I’ve made my point. So, when I have a friendship, I try to safeguard it from any possible mix-ups that can happen.  I know what these are because they’ve all happened before at some time in a previous friendship.  I safeguard it by explaining about autism and what could happen along the way in life. I tell my friends (all five) that I’m on the spectrum and there’s a distinct possibility I will [...]
  • General

    The Same Only Different – Maura Campbell

    Imagine for a moment what it would be like if medical practitioners talked about red haired people the way they talk about autistics.  (Stay with me.) A description of a redhead might go something like this: Nearly 2% of people worldwide suffer from redhead disorder. Symptoms include abnormally pale skin, unusually thick hair follicles, hyper-sensitivity to changes in temperature and excessive freckling. There is no known cure. Within the redhead community, a debate might ensue about the relative merits of identity-first language (‘redhead’) versus person-first language (‘person with redheadedness’).  Some people might get in a lather over whether those with strawberry blonde locks were ‘ginger enough’ to be included in the definition of ‘redhead’. There might even be an ethical debate about whether it was [...]
  • Advocacy

    ‘Take me to your leader’ – Autism and leadership by Jeanette Purkis

    Last night I was in a room full of people considered leaders—people making a difference in community work, CEOs and entrepreneurs, people with even longer CV’s than me! I was a finalist in the ACT Excellence in Leadership Awards for the second year running. As I listened to the accomplishments of all the finalists and when I heard my own biography read out, I reflected on leadership—specifically what it means to me and why it is useful in the Autism community. I jotted down a note to write a post on Autism and leadership, got my certificate and then did some serious networking. On paper I am definitely a ‘leader’—I have four major awards for leadership, spend a lot of my time on Boards and [...]
Featured

Playing by the rules by Lisa Morgan

by Spectrum Women in Featured

Remember playing tag?  Trying to avoid the person who was “it” as they chased you around?  Laughing and playing as kids dodged around running as fast as they could to not get tagged?  There was always the time when running just a bit ahead of the tagger, who was gaining on you, that home base came into view.  Heading towards home base and getting there first without being tagged… and you’re safe!!  That wonderful feeling [...]

Creativity – Jeanette Purkis

by Spectrum Women in Arts

It is 2011 in the psychiatric ward at Canberra Hospital, the dingy and oppressive and thankfully now long-closed ‘PSU.’ There is a new patient, a woman who doesn’t say much, looks agitated and scared and who wanders around all night looking at the linoleum tiles which have sparkles in them. She constantly listens to music on a tiny green iPod. Her diagnosis is indeterminate at this point [...]

The Glass of Milk – Maura Campbell

by Spectrum Women in My Life

The teacher, a stern woman of a certain age, folded her arms across her ample bosom and stared intently over the top of her thick-rimmed glasses.  The reason for her evident irritation cowered before her – a painfully shy seven-year-old girl. A glass of milk sat untouched in front of the child. Mrs S. had [...]

BOOK REVIEW: Am I Autistic? by Lydia Andal

by Spectrum Women in Book Releases

AM I AUTISTIC? A guide to Autism & Asperger’s Self-Diagnosis for Adults By Lydia Andal Published by New Idealist Limited, London Review by Terri Mayne International Aspergirl Society UK Ambassador    “Am I Autistic?” is a refreshing and positive book about autism in adults, focusing on autistic adults without learning difficulties. What makes this book stand out is that the author demonstrates the things that autistics can do, and do well, and not just what they [...]

Autism April

Disclosure – The Pros and Cons – Maura Campbell

April 22, 2017

Whether to disclose an autism diagnosis is an important issue for many newly diagnosed adults. I would never presume to tell someone in that position what to do, though I would encourage them to take a bit of time to think about it.  What is said cannot subsequently be unsaid. After I was told, in a private consultation, that I had Asperger Syndrome I pretty much burst out of the Aspie closet immediately.  I hadn’t given the matter of disclosure much thought, which was uncharacteristic for me since I usually overthink practically everything.  I was so euphoric on the day […]

Latest News

Developing a National Guideline for Autism Diagnosis in Australia – Viewpoint Survey – Autism CRC

April 24, 2017

Australia’s first ever national guideline for diagnosing autism is under development. We strongly believe that these guideline should be informed by the needs and wants of people with lived experience of receiving a diagnosis and not just the perspectives of health professionals, service providers and policy makers. This research project is about creating the opportunity for this to happen. Please share this study with family members, friends, members and clients so as many people as possible can share their views. Who can participate?  Adolescents (12 year and over) and adults with a diagnosis of ASD under the DSM-5 (or equivalent […]

Featured

Autistic Women, Pregnancy and Motherhood – Lana Grant

February 16, 2017

I was diagnosed with Asperger syndrome in 2007 at the age of 38. I was already a mother of five children when I received my diagnosis. The process was not straightforward and it followed on, as is quite common, from one of my son’s diagnosis of Asperger syndrome. Two years later I was pregnant with my youngest child. As I had my diagnosis I decided to use Mr. Google to see if I could connect with other autistic, pregnant women. Unfortunately, the results returned were not exactly what I was looking for. If you type in pregnant + autistic you […]

Latest News

The Chameleons: Women with Autism

June 19, 2016

We often hear about autism in men, but rarely in women. SBS The Feed, looks at three different generations of women living with autism and how the stigma of the condition is amplified. We often hear about autism in men, but rarely in women. The Feed looks at three different generations of women living with autism and how the stigma of the condition is amplified by gender. More than 200,000 Australians have autism. It’s diagnosed four times more in males than in females and some experts in the field believe this reflects a failure of diagnostic processes rather than a […]

POEM by Lennée Reid

July 28, 2017
Say I’m sensitive. Do not enlighten people with neurology 101 or explain how I feel sound like whispers are feathers and pow wows are heart beats and a dog squealing in pain stings like needles. [...]

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Spectrum Suite, LLC – Samantha Craft

Spectrum Suite, LLC is a service-oriented company founded in 2016 in Washington state, USA, dedicated to celebrating neurodiversity through all forms of art and artistic expression. Our services include supporting authors and artists, producing and providing quality and unique neurodiverse literature, and serving the neurodiverse community and their loved ones through community outreach, gatherings, and educational events.

http://www.myspectrumsuite.com/

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Latest Book Releases

Book Releases

BOOK REVIEW: The Chalk Rainbow

July 24, 2017

The Chalk Rainbow – Deborah Kelly & Gwynneth Jones Publisher: Exisle Publishing Price: $24.99 Ages: 4- 8 years Specifications: Hardback | 215 x 288 mm | Colour | 32 Pages | Bundled with Teachers Notes Download Zone Independent review by Linda Wemyss The Chalk Rainbow, by Deborah Kelly (author of the Ruby Wishfinger series), and illustrated by Gwynneth Jones, is a story about Zane and his sister. Written in first person from the point of view of Zane’s sister (her name is not revealed), we learn that there are many things about Zane that are different: he has his own language, […]

Book Releases

BOOK REVIEW: Am I Autistic? by Lydia Andal

January 19, 2017

AM I AUTISTIC? A guide to Autism & Asperger’s Self-Diagnosis for Adults By Lydia Andal Published by New Idealist Limited, London Review by Terri Mayne International Aspergirl Society UK Ambassador    “Am I Autistic?” is a refreshing and positive book about autism in adults, focusing on autistic adults without learning difficulties. What makes this book stand out is that the author demonstrates the things that autistics can do, and do well, and not just what they can’t do. Lydia Andal uses the phrase “Professional Autistic” to perfectly describe the autistic who has a career, lives independently yet may find it difficult […]

Book Releases

Living Through Suicide Loss with an Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD) ~ Lisa Morgan M.Ed.

November 20, 2016

An Insider Guide for Individuals, Family, Friends, and Professional Responders Losing someone to suicide brings daily tribulations and long-term challenges. These challenges are exacerbated when you have Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). This book looks at how suicide loss is experienced and processed by people who have ASD, and how they can be supported by those around them. Losing someone to suicide can open up a world of pain, confusion and grief, and for people with ASDs, the effect can be acute and extremely challenging. Reaching out to fellow Aspies, Lisa Morgan proffers her insight and advice to ensure that others […]

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